Fantasy In Real Life: Tree Cathdral, Bergamo

The Fantasy in Real Life series is dedicated to showcasing the weird and wonderful creations and natural phenomenon that occur around the world. This week we visit Bergamo, a city in Lombardy, Italy. Located just 25 miles northeast of Milan, Bergamo can be considered part of the greater Milan metropolitan area. To the north are the foothills of the Bergamo Alps.

As an ancient city, there are plenty of cathedrals and other examples of medieval architecture in Bergamo, but today we are going to focus on something new.

imageThe tree cathedral was the brain child of Italian artist, Giuliano Mauri, and is touted as one of the world’s most impressive examples of organic architecture. A lover of nature, Mauri created the original plans in 2001. Sadly, he died in 2009 before the work could be realized.

In 2010, the International Year of Biodiversity, Mauri’s plans were put into action as a tribute to his life’s work. 42 beech trees were planted to form a basilica of five aisles will grow into the supporting columns. These beeches are supported by fir poles and branches of hazelnut and chestnut that have been woven together. These will be allowed to deteriorate as the beech trees grow larger. image (1)

Additional resources and articles about the Tree Cathedral:

Advertisements

Fantasy in Real Life: Bridge of Immortals, Huangshan, China

Bridge-of-Immortals-7

Huangshan, literally translated as “yellow mountains,” are an epic range of steep jagged granite peaks nestled in eastern China. It is one of China’s major tourist attractions and is often a subject of traditional Chinese paintings and literature, as well as modern photography.

It is not, however, for the faint of heart.  Many of the foot paths wander along high steep cliffs, and there is even a section that must be traversed by walking across narrow planks while gripping a chain anchored into the rock. But the pay out is worth it. The tops of the peaks look out over an amazing landscape above a sea of clouds.

6

7

It is rumored that James Cameron found his inspiration for the landscape in his movie Avatar from a visit to the Huangshan.

The Bridge of Immortals is the world’s highest bridge, putting visitors above the clouds. It leads to a cave carved deep into the rock. Part of the lore around the mountains is that the Yellow Emperor. Emperor Xuanyuan, the legendary founder of the Chinese nation and ancestor to the nationalities of the central plains, attained enlightenment there and became immortal.

To learn more about Huangshan, and the Bridge of Immortals check out these links:

To see more of the Fantasy in Real Life series, click here!

Fantasy in Real Life: Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco

Image credit: Wearableworldnews.com

Image credit: Wearableworldnews.com

The Palace of Fine Arts is one of the few sights of the Fantasy in Real Life Series that I’ve actually visited.  Located in the marina district of San Francisco, this stunning structure is a magnet for photographers and artists alike.

The Palace was originally built as a part of the Panama-Pacific Exhibition, a world fair that ran from February 20th to December 4th in 1915. This particular fair was to celebrate the completion of the Panama Canal and also showcase San Francisco’s recovery from the 1906 earthquake.

The Palace of Fine Arts was one of ten separate palaces that dotted the over 600 acre exhibition, the other nine palaces were for education, liberal arts, manufactures, varied industries, agriculture, food products, transportation, mines and metallurgy, and machinery.

The exhibition was not built to last, the Palace of Fine Arts was built primarily of wood and then covered with a mixture of plaster and burlap-type fiber.  The original intention was for all the palaces to be torn down at the end of the fair, but the Palace of Fine Arts was so popular that the Palace Preservation League was formed before the end of the fair.

Despite their best efforts, the Palace fell into ruin and fell to vandalism.  In 1964 the original Palace was torn down save the steel structure of the exhibit hall, and rebuilt using newer more durable materials, like lightweight poured-in-place concrete. In 1969, the exhibit hall became home to the interactive museum, the Exploratorium.

To learn more about the Palace of Fine arts, check out these links below:

For more of the Fantasy In Real LIfe Series, Click here!

Fantasy in Real Life – The Hill Giant, Austria

hillgiantaustriaIn the small town of Wattens; located in Tyrol, Austria; is the world famous Swarovski Crystal factory. In 1995 they had their 100th anniversary and to celebrate they commissioned Viennese artist Andre Heller to design a series of unique attractions designed to please crystal lovers around the world.

To enter the “Kristallwelten” one must pass the eye catching Hill Giant that marks the entrance. His eyes are none other than large crystals and a waterfall flows from his mouth. The Hill giant was constructed in 1983.  Inside the Kristallwelten you can find the “Wunderkammern” (or “Cabinets of Marvel”) where each of the artists involved in the project has their own installment.

Later, in 2003, the Kristallwelten was expanded to include several other attractions including a 3D projection “Planet der Kristalle”, the “Kristalldom” (or “Crystal Cupola”), and the giant kaleidoscope filled with healing crystals, the “Kristalloskop”. Outside there is a maze in the shape of a hand

Related sites:

Travel Spotting: The Hill Giant, Austria

Swarovski Kristallwelten

Fantasy in Real Life: ‘Becoming’ by Ted Metz

There is a stunning piece of sculpture at the University of Montevallo created by Ted Metz, an art professor, and forty of his students.  The piece, entitled “Becoming” is explained in a UM brochure in these terms:

“The younger hand, that of the student, reaches skyward. It’s pose and size suggest the potential for continuous growth and development.

The more mature hand, that of the teacher, appears to have been guiding the student’s hand but has now fallen back, representing a new role of support for the student.

The space separating the hands represents the student’s graduation, the event when the student takes what he as learned into the next phase of life.”

The sculpture was dedicated on February 15, 2003 on the UM campus opposite Bowers Colonnade on the corner of the King House quad.

Related articles:

UM Campus Tour Brochure

Shelby County Reporter: ‘Becoming’ sculpture dedicated at UM

l

Fantasy in Real Life: The Kelpies

Groupe-F-perform-a-light-flame-and-sound-show-during-the-launch-of-The-Kelpies-sculpture1218x910_Kelpies_sunset

The Kelpies are 30 meter tall (nearly 100 feet) horse head sculptures in Falkirk, Scotland and were finished in October of 2013. They opened to the public in April of this year. They commemorate the completion of a new extension to the Forth and Clyde Canal.

Historically, Kelpies are mythological water creatures that have inhabited Scotland’s waterways and lochs for thousands of years. They can appear in many forms, including human, but are most commonly associated with horses and are said to have the strength and endurance of 10 horses.

In the Falkirk area horses have played a major role in the economy and industry and were used to pull the wagons, ploughs, barges, and coalships along the canals. The sculptures pay homage to this heritage.

From the Wikipedia entry:

According to sculptor Andy Scott “The original concept of mythical water horses was a valid starting point for the artistic development of the structures.”[7] “I took that concept and moved with it towards a more equine and contemporary response, shifting from any mythological references towards a socio-historical monument intended to celebrate the horse’s role in industry and agriculture as well as the obvious association with the canals as tow horses.”[8] 

According to Scott the end result would be “Water-borne, towering gateways into The Helix, the Forth & Clyde Canal and Scotland, translating the legacy of the area into proud equine guardians.”[7]

Read more about the Kelpies:

Speculative Fiction with Shia Labeouf

It’s no surprise that I love YouTube and pop culture.  So, when I found this awesome little piece – just in time for Halloween I might add – I knew I had to share it.

Speculative fiction is when a story has one or more elements that aren’t considered part of the real world including magic, fantasy creatures, and unreal settings.  It includes such genres as horror, fantasy, sci-fi, paranormal, and yes, even vampire romances.

Since Shia isn’t an actual cannibal, as far as we know, this lovely piece of internet is a solid horror story instead of a factual recounting. It is also the most bizarre thing I’ve seen all year, and that’s saying something.